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in the basin and technical aspects of energy in the boat and who wrote the whole manuscript to check on the scientific details of it. well, this is an appropriate day for talking about regulation to disaster because less that president obama promised once more to develop the energy sources of the future. republican or democrat decides to develop energy projects, taxpayers had better watch out. governments get in the business of picking winners and losers, which leads to cronyism and wasted taxpayer dollars. this is the question of industrial policy. whether government should support business ventures and new technology that are unable to secure private hunting, government appears to be worse than private market in the records that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar comp
for fair and it was unique and different. it gave them a coat he shin and energy not seen. but those who fought and roker were to have a lot of experience thinking they had a fortnight to live. when they came home to see institutional threats to their service it mustered an extraordinary amount of completion and focus to push back successfully. >>host: what was the marines role in the curia? >> the first forces comment not sent in but said does conventional combat troops to push back the advance. but they got their early. even though the marine corps had no orders they immediately started and these guys came. what this meant in the critical first battle they have their own naval aviation flying over head. the the ability to flyover to be rid the radar will list important. >> you mentioned political lobbying. how did that occur? >> after rover to all services reorganize. we don't have the war department were new department. >> of the start of the process but they did down one taye said kent weigh
, this is begin to stink after three days. the toll in energy is used -- huge. he was once marge you. is impossible to convene the smallest and most transitory of human groups without an attempt to -- improvising. culture grows in mysterious ways. its growth has nothing to do with reason. is it reasonable that all americans have to say what seems to be the trouble officer. where is it written? they have to say hi, we can't come to the phone right now. leave your name and number. where in the world of these forms prescribed? a culture extemporizes itself and observances and response to communal necessity to deal with which it also extemporizes. these myths no less than political deals are most organizations can derive only from a limited return number of human problems and solutions. the left discovery of global warming, the sinfulness of man causing the seas to rise may also be found in genesis six. and consider the taking of snapshots before they're shutters clicked. the photographer says one, two, three. well, here's why. photography, exposure could last up to three minutes. so the
in their community in a positive way, what happened was they were able to refocus a lot of that mental energy not on the past but on the future. and as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we see the manifestation of some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder actually go down over time. i think the third and final thing we need to do for young men and women who have come home are facing this is to let them know that this is normal. it is an absolutely normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. a situation of extraordinary and violent and difficult and hardship, and is normal to come back and do not want is somebody stand behind you, do not want to be sitting at a restaurant in the middle of lots of people. that's a normal reaction to one of the things we have to do when people come back is to make sure that they now they, this is a normal and natural place, and let them know that there are many people who have been able and found ways to work through this. so we have to give them hope by letting them know this is norma
know, meditation, energy work. in prison there's almost no medical care, dental care, things like that, for people on death row. they're not going to put a lot of time and energy and effort into taking care of someone that they plan on killing. so i started suffering a lot of health problems over the years. it started getting worse and worse, and the only thing i had to help me through that was the medication techniques -- meditation techniques and the energy work, things of that nature. that was what helped me make it through. it also kept me focused in the present moment. you have a lot of people in prison the reason they go crazy is because they're always looking towards some day in the future when they're going to be out, and that's what they're living for. it's like today doesn't matter. i'm always looking at some date five years down the road, ten years down the road, a day that may not even exist. but doing that routine, doing that work it kept me focused in the present moment which probably saved by sanity. >> do you think conceivably you could have lived out your days in that
, energy workers and it is medical care, dental care, things like that on death row. putting the energy and to someone they plan on killing. so i started suffering a lot of health problems over the years getting worse and worse and the only thing i had to help me through that is the meditation techniques, things of that nature. that is what helped me to make it through and it also kept me focus on the present moment. you have a lot of people in prison that go crazy because they are always looking towards someday in the future when they are going to be out. that is what they are living for. it's like today doesn't matter. i'm always looking at someday five years down the road, ten years down the road, a year that may not even exist. but doing it routine, it kept me focused in the present moment, which probably saved my sanity. >> do you think you could have lived out your days in that prison if you had to and have some relative measure of, you know, to use the real world happy life? >> i think i would have lived for maybe a year at the most or launder. i we 60 pounds today more than i di
is they were able to refocus a lot of their mental energy on the past but on the future. as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we saw a manifestation of some of the symptoms go down over time. i think the third and final thing that we need to do is to let men and women know that this is normal. it is a normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. in a situation of difficulty and violence, it is hard to come back and not want to have someone stand behind you and sit in a restaurant in the middle of things. one of the things we have to do is make sure that people know they are in a normal and natural place and let them know that there are many people who have been able to and found ways to work through them. we have to help them know that this is normal and that people have done this successfully. if we can do all of that, keep people connected, let them know there is a sense of purpose and they are all right where they are at, then we find that a lot of people, even those with extreme cases, they can beat the condition and lead fulf
his whole energy on behalf of the union. as late as february 1861, in the middle of the crisis of the union, lincoln professed that during my whole political life i have revered clay as a teacher and leader. he also noted clay's opposition to slavery. several times we can make clear to point to his detestation of slavery. lincoln didn't invent anti-slavery. he downplayed his ability to moderate that stance. he did detest the institution. he even did so unsuccessfully to get his state to adopt gradual emancipation. he also said that he would never force lavery word had not previously existed. yet in 1850, clay declared that if the citizens they are placed slavery in their constitutions, he would honor their choice, and he did back the compromise of 1850, which gave the possibility of slavery in the new mexico and utah territories. the clay, no other moral issue match the importance for maintenance of the union. lincoln also spoke about compromise. publicly stood for the compromise in 1850. he announced that i, too, go for saving the union. much as i hate slavery, he said, i woul
, continue to encourage any energy independence. a resolution of the supply of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation this country so desperately needs. although it is not a subject of this paper, one can ask, will he be reelected? historically, rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term with popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. but so does romney. it is interesting to note that only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their re-election -- had relatively low popularity ratings at the time of their re-election. these were woodrow wilson, harry truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced troubled or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility that obama would win not based on statistics like this, but becau
and everybody. that is when we see the web innovation mall, when we see the creativity, the energy of everybody start to come to bear on the biggest industries in the world. this is the maker movement. there are many definitions of the maker movement. i think the credit for the term goes to dale dougherty who works for o'reilly of o'reilly publishing company. around 2005-2016 recognized there was something going on, he saw web generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as wel
in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue jubal early's army to the death, and to destroy the shenandoah valley's grains, produce and lives
manufacturing tools to anybody and everybody. that is when we start to see the creativity and the energy of everybody starting to come to their is some of the biggest industries in the world. this is the major movement. there are many definitions and i just want to give you a little technology about it. the credit goes to jail dorsey who works for o'reilly. a big publishing company. around 2005 or 2006, he recognized that there was something going on. the web generation was starting to use their hands more. he created makers magazine, it was hugely successful, they do more than 100,000 people that go to these fairs every weekend. and i think it is the maker movement which is something identify with birds. they spotted that this was technology driven. so the roots are a little bit in the 60s, social change, power to the people, not san francisco, but the roots in the country. i think that they recognize that there was a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things. and the recognition that peopl
may be in the audience today but that energy and talent and brains around energizing and dingy nearing a community capability to lift people is what we have going on in the city and why this room is full. >> i ask the development question because i feel compelled to ask a news oriented question. i don't know why. [talking over each other] >> the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a $1 billion casino complex built in east boston if the developers win the eastern massachusetts casino license, one of three licenses up for grabs from east to west in the state. the gaming commission has to go through its process but most insiders you talked to think the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way and i am wondering, let me start with you, edward glaeser and then go to ayanna pressley. i am wondering if this panel thinks that project, if built, will prove to be a triumph of the city? >> i am relatively agnostic, i don't think gambling is a great sin and not a terrible thing but on the other hand it is unlikely to meet any sort of wellspring
today, but that energy, that tall element, that -- talent, that brains around energizing and engineering a community's capability to lift people. that's what we've got going on in this city. that's why this room is full. >> absolutely. >> i ask the development question because i feel compelled to ask a news-oriented question, i don't know why. [laughter] >> bob, can i say one thing? >> i'll get you weighing in in a second. the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a billion dollar casino complex being built in east boston at the suffolk downs race track if the developers, when the eastern massachusetts casino license -- one of the three up for grabs from east to west in the state -- the new state gaming commission, of course, has to go through its process, but most insiders you talk to think that the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way. and i'm wondering, and, ed, let me start with you here, and then i want to go to ayanna. i'm wondering if this panel thinks if that project, if built, will prove to be a triumph of the city? >> i, i'
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14